September 11, 2009



"My grace is sufficient for you, for My strength is made perfect in weakness. Therefore I take pleasure in infirmities, in reproaches, in needs, in persecutions, in distresses, for Christ's sake. For when I am weak, then I am strong." 2 Corinthians 12:9-10 (NKJV)

How does a person achieve extraordinary success? Ken Kragen, a major Hollywood agent, took talented performers like Kenny Rogers, Travis Tritt, and Lionel Ritchie and made them superstars. His observations on what makes the difference between a star and a superstar might surprise you.

Lots of people sing beautifully, work hard, and stay focused, yet still don't make it to the top.

According to Ken, author of Life is a Contact Sport, superstars are usually the people who get the most help. He taught his clients to cultivate help by making more contacts, sending more thank you notes, and just being nice. Being "helpable" is key to achieving your full potential.

God answers a request from Paul in 2 Corinthians with the phrase we all know so well, "My strength is made perfect in your weakness."

In other words God is saying to Paul, "By admitting you have weaknesses and need help, you can be so much stronger. If you try to do everything on your own, you'll only get so far."

Paul may not have been able to accomplish what he did for the Kingdom of God if he had not understood this message.

By opening himself up to God's help, Paul achieved superstar status in the Bible. He appreciated God's direct help spiritually, as well as the help he received through the people God had placed in his life. In most of Paul's letter we see him thanking his brethren and asking for continued help and support.

By admitting you have weaknesses and need help, your life will be so much more successful. By allowing God to work with you and through you, achieving success is not only easier, it's more lasting and more fulfilling.

Being created by God, we all have the potential for being superstars in the kingdom if only we allow ourselves to accept His help.

by Bonnie St. John, an Olympic medalist

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